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barack obama rank now among our presidents? it's lincoln first, then washington, then f.d.r. and washington. where do presidential historians think barack obama may someday rank? dreams of glory. how does president obama look at adams, washington and jefferson? does he even look at the founders for inspiration? finally, second terms are o beset by problems, even scandals and crises often come during second terms. will the second term for barack obama bring him the chance for greatness? i'm chris matthews, welcome to the show. with us today, jon meacham, presidential historian and author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power," michael beschloss, presidential historian, annette gordon-reed, author of "the hemingses of monticello," and jodi kantor, "new york times" writer. as president obama looks to his special terms, historians look at his past with great decisions and great achievements. the president met with several historians during his first term to get their vials. in fact, jodi kantor has written about those sessions between the president and the historians. how d
>> "inside washington" is brought to you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make you work. -- to make america work. for more information, go to afge.org. >> supported in part by politico.com. >> president obama asked me to come to israel with a very clear message, america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. >> this week on "inside washington" hillary clinton is on the case. >> i want to welcome secretary clinton once again to jerusalem. >> back home, racing toward the fiscal cliff. >> to show our seriousness, which would revenue on the table. >> presidential politics. >> forget about it. >> he is smart and the kind of leader we need for future of our country. >> it really is the nation's laws, losing david patraeus. >> personally, this is a heartbreak. >> full disclosure, we are putting this program together the day before thanksgiving and we come to you with the fervent hope that events will not overcome us. on this day, or families come first, like yours. let's start with the bloody conflict between israel and hamas in
-- controversial thing. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty, and the only major obstacle to the purchase then arises is that jefferson, himself, strict views of the power of the federal government led him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire territory, and he starts to hem and haw and say what we need is a constitutional amendment to give the government this power. now, napolian in france overthrew his government. he was not likely would be impressed by the argument. he makes noises saying, look, i'll just revoke the treaty. it's not been ratified yet. madison, our baseline alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right, in the room for every negotiation. madison comes to jefferson, you can't do this anymore. you have to agree. you have to yield. it's too big an opportunity to let your strict view of the federal government hold sway. he backs down. they go. they make the purchase. that's fine. the way this story goes
washington had to iranians. the same two the united states military stuck around to help train. >>host: first, was there any resentment on the countries where they talk about to damage their affairs or monitor hours? was there a resentment? >> that is a complicated question. in a period of 1968 and the british manage their withdrawal, many arab emirates announced they were happy to see the british leave. and did a guy is of the persian gulf they profess they did not want the united states to replace them. in private the era of small emirates along the coast were petrified. 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection and those and their leaders made offers to both london and washington to offer financial incentives for the british and americans to stay. they were afraid of the giant neighbor to the north north, i ran that since world war ii had been attempting to reassert the influence that they had enjoyed in previous centuries and fearful of their own neighbors. many arab states harbored border disputes some claim the territory some claiming the island's in between. so
? >> they think of washington d.c. are the national monument why do they think of of potomac river? >> for those in the area is seen as an obstacle as they drive over or under it i wanted to stress we have an incredible natural resource there are very few levies we have bald eagles it is not solely clean but we work on that and by the way we get 90% of the drinking water comes out of the river. >> talk about the historical significance can you give us examples? >> mount vernon that washington known to because if you live there you got to pick the site of the nation's capital. now vernon is the most significant building on the potomac historic way. >> in your research i'm guessing you spent time on the river? >> i went to several hundred to visit to combine history with recreation. i hit all the sites people could go to but also take a hike or a jump in a canoe to have a good time. it is an enormous recreation opportunity for people visiting the area. >> thank you so much. >> by the way i have a sequel comin
] ♪ >>> my name is mary numyer. i live in washington but met chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised
spears, speaker pelosi, senator feinstein and senator boxer you will well served in washington d c and the people will be well served by this project. thank you san francisco. >> secretary lahood. thank you very much for that wonderful news. >> [inaudible] >> it's a really truly a great day for san francisco. great cities need great public transportation systems, and you know what? you know what makes our city great with all these leaders? they listen. they listen to our communities. they understand -- because for years our communities pleaded we need better transportation systems what makes our leaders so great they listen and they act. that is so wonderful. that is what standard that we have for all of our public officials. secretary lahood if you could thank president obama from all of us. yes. [applause] because i know today we're going to spend a lot of precious moments thanking leader pelosi and congress women fine 79 and boxer and. >> >> we're going to thank all of our community members and from china town and all of them have worked very hard. these are not easy pr
me now, cnbc washington reporter eamon javers. you heard the numbers we just ran down. what is the short-term tangible consequence if we don't get action on the fiscal cliff. >> cote is right, it does cause uncertainly. life is uncertain and so they know that there's going to be this issue and that washington is going to wrestle with it. in the short term, the very short term, i think actually some of the hype around the fiscal cliff is a little overblown, particularly because the first couple of days or week or so after we go over the fiscal cliff we won't see all that many impacts. all these tax and spending impacts take months to go into effect. it doesn't impact the economy until people start paying taxes, which could be several months down the line for most americans. on the spending side as well, spending is built into the cake so again you'd be looking at stuff that would be impacting the out months. for the first couple of months, no real specific impact. the big thing to worry about is whether wall street freaks out or not about the fact that we've gone over the fis
the brunt of this battle and they should not defend taxpayers but the spending interests in washington, strikes me as odd. the effort by some to get entitlement reform, the democrats have said heck no and harry reid has said it ain't happening, and they ought to look at that, rather than trying to raise taxes to pay for obama's bigger government. >>neil: do you hear it is spreading? we have chatted about this before. you were open when we chatted in washington, to talk about the cliff cliff, to not equateing bringing in causes or tax loopholes and the like and closing them off, your point was as long as it leads eventually to revamping of the tax code, but this goes beyond that, they have no quid pro quo and they are offering this, you argue, what? >>guest: well, there are two ways you can damage the economy. one is to increase marginal tax rates, everyone knows the small business groups, it would kill 700,000 jobs off the bat, probably worse. the other thing is to eliminate $1 trillion, not talking about a few deductions, but talking about $1 trillion worth of deductions and credits w
people here in washington are calling the fiscal cliff. today, we have new proof that people across the country not only are aware of what's going on, they're very, very worried. our new poll shows 68% say the country will face either a crisis or major problems if the cuts in taxes aren't avoided. and a whopping 77% say their personal financial situation will be affected by a failure to solve the fiscal cliff problem. despite this nationwide sense of urgency, there's only a little talk of compromise right now as lawmakers return to washington. our congressional correspondent, kate bolduan, has been working her sources on capitol hill and what's going on. stakes are enormous right now. what's going on? >> they were away for a week. staff was supposed to be working. but lawmakers are arriving back in town with no real whisper of an imminent breakthrough at the moment to avoid this looming series of tax increases and spending cuts that could very well damage the economy. but the air of compromise among some notable republicans is definitely grabbing attention. the republicans' comments
that we should stick to the principal principle message that we have said. washington is running way too much money. there may be differences in want of other issues, but on this one, most americans agree that there's too much waste and fraud and abuse and let's eliminate that. cheryl: where do they fit into this scenario? fatcat ceos, those from honeywell, allstate, do you think that that is going to be a positive conversation? will congressional leaders listen? >> i would think that they have been listening to the ceos all along. and even looking at wall street and main street and they all say the same thing. we want certainty out of washington. we haven't gotten it from this administration, whether it is dodd-frank and all the mess that the excessive spending. so i think that wall street and main street will say the same thing. stop spending so much, put your fiscal house in order. >> let me ask you about warren buffett. warren buffett saying that there's no tax pledge doesn't work. today, and i would like to play this to you over and over, he responded. take a listen to this. >> i ag
-- host: welcome to "washington journal." of the senate host: an increase in payroll taxes and the scheduled spending cuts across the board. a couple republicans yesterday signaled they could be flexible on the anti-tax pledge that they signed if it gets them closer to a deal with the white house. what is your reaction? here are the numbers to call. you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join us on facebook. you can also e-mail us. here's "usa today" looking at what happened on the sunday talk shows. it says -- the south carolina senator became the second republican senator in recent days to back away from a no tax pledge devised in the decades ago. the willingness to break ranks could prove crucial as gop leaders and democrats try to reach a deal before taxing and spending changes take effect in january. new york representative king says economic conditions have changed since the anti-tax pledge first emerged. he's a republican. that thee gop's say fiscal cliff deal is what defined grover norquist. let's hear congressman pete king of new york, a republican. he was
mitchell live in washington. congress is back. grover norquist's tax pledge could be history. and all eyes are now focusing on house republicans as talks to avoid going over that so-called fiscal cliff are picking up steam. joining me now, mark halperin, senior political analyst for "time" and msnbc and ruth marcus, columnist and editorial writer for the "washington post." to you, mark, what is your read about what we've been hearing the last couple of days about grover norquist, the pledge and how much running room the speaker does have to b negotiating a deal. >> i did a spit take with my fruity pebbles watching "morning joe" because eric cantor's tone was unlike anything i've ever heard. his office is saying oh, no, he's against raising marginal rates, but it's clear that in the scheme of things, the biggest piece is does john boehner have enough running room to strike a deal involving some new revenue. i still am of the belief that the vote in the house, which will be a cliff hanger no matter what happens amongst the leaders in the white house, it will be a tough vote. i think it will
. >>> lawmakers return to washington today with just 35 days until the "fiscal cliff" happens. and believe it or not, airlines are trying to keep queue on time. we'll explain now. >>> first business starts now. >>> you are watching first business. >>> good morning, it is monday, november 26, i am bill, so, did you survive black friday and welcome to super mondays. the holiday shopping season is now if full swing. we are going to spend more the last few weeks of the year than last year. remember tomorrow is giving tuesday. consider what you might do. >>> 35 days now for congress to solve that little impasse . this week they are going to try to make a deal. and is europe just buying greece? today finance minterred meet again to talk about releasing more billions your rows. >>> and now tim, he is the managing partner, so, tim, the eu, they are met meting again today and it still looks like they need money to go to greece. how much are traders going be paying attention to this? >> well, i think it is going p quite a bit of attention because it is a critical issues. and after three years of res
and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's
. it is pretty narrow. it does show they're frustrated because they were sent to washington to negotiate, make deals, make things happen and they find themselves ham strung by this guy that voters haven't really heard of and saying who elected him? >> a lot just know they don't want to go off the fiscal cliff. here is the question. if republicans are building to eliminate deductions for wealthy, make the wealthy pay more, is it too far for democrats to push to get rates increased? what's the difference? >> i think the real problem here with democrats as far as democrats are concerned is how willing to do sbiegts entitlement reform are they? you heard lindsey graham say he is willing to change position on taxes if democrats come to the table with entitlement reform. president obama privately indicated he is willing to stick his neck out and durbin willing to do that and will nor liberal democrats come to the table with entitlement reform. we'll see if that is a bigger dynamic that changes this week. >> what is the danger i guess is one question because there are democrats like patty murray sayi
. and i'm old enough to remember when you were a lawyer here in washington, and one of my best friends was your law partner in that old law firm. how did you get into this? i mean, what-- >> i had been writing since i was a kid. i was trying to sell short stories to the "new yorker" when i was 14 and realized if i changed my name to j.d. salinger my odds would be considerably improved. i spent 10 years writing short stories, that's what i really love to do. and i liked to read short stories in high school and college but i had no success doing that. i had a family early on, and it was something i kept doing. i went into screen play writing for a while and got an agent in hollywood which is almost impossible because most agents in hollywood i met don't know there is a state called virginia. they don't think anything exists owz of california. and i started writing my first novel "absolute power," and that kind of changed my life. i thought it would be the novel that would get the attention of an agent, and it was the big break i needed. >> schieffer: that later became a movie. >> it did
is in washington with all details this morning. good morning to you. >> talks are starting on capitol hill this week amid new signs republicans are willing to take a new look at an anti-tax pledge they made. president obama and congress begin negotiations this week to avoid the coming fiscal cliff. about $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in at year-end. both sides say they're looking for ways to compromise. >> that's what representative government should be about. no one gets all they want. if reagan and o'neill could do it, boehner and obama should be able to do it. >> reporter: but republicans have consistently voted against any deal that raises tax revenue. >> the key here is whether or not the republicans will move away from the ideologically rigid position which has been the grover/norquist pledge which most of them signed that they will not go for additional revenues. >> reporter: for the first time, even the anti-tax pledge appears to be negotiable. several republicans are indicating they're open to breaking that promise. >> when you're $16 trillio
, they weren't alone. finally there's washington. we headed into the weekend with lots of talk. lots of talk about good feelings. good feelings over possible deal to avert the fiscal cliff. republicans seem to be breaking ranks with the hardliners. talk about maybe raising revenues if the democrats will be willing to do meaningful entitlement reform. that positive tone, the rising above, helped move up the futures right into the bell. who wanted to be short ahead of a weekend deal? what a difference a day makes. this morning we come in, what are they chattering about? greece. greece. can you believe greece? it's standing in the way of a european deal again. this small country with no grip on its finances has europe hostage all over again. without a deal, everything in europe came down last night. we didn't get a sunday night easing from china. worried that the recent positive data can't be maintained without more interest rate cuts. you know what, we've been conditioned to believe weaker economic data means more stimulus, which leads to higher stock prices here. what happens if the news isn'
commission member elise walter as her replacement. eamon javers is in washington with the details. >> reporter: this is a bit of a surprise announcement. a lot of other names had been speculated over the past couple of days here on who might succeed mary shapiro over at s.e.c. but the tap goes to elise walter today. she is a sitting s.e.c. commissioner now. that means that the president will not have to face a bruising confirmation battle up on capitol hill for her to take over as the chair of the s.e.c. what we're told is the president is likely to appoint somebody to fill out that term after elisse walter finishes up mary shapiro's term in 2014. we expect that the president will name somebody else to follow on after elisse walter. a little bit of complicated moving and shaking here but already the consideration in washington turning to mary shapiro's legacy. she took over at one of the darkest points in american financial history in january of 2009. the s.e.c. pointing out today that just in 2011 and 2012, they've had 1,469 enforcement actions. they say that's evidence of a real
thing and i hope he does it because i think it is important people you said outside of washington know the kinds of gains going on on capitol hill and the things this people voted for not being acted upon by republicans. >> as i was talking with congressman van holen, again, there is a growing number of gop folk that is seem to be backing away from grover norquist's tax pledge. given that the very idea of raising taxes could be damaging to any republican who might be facing a primary in the next year, is there really enough support for shunning norquist at this point? >> you remember, even when george bush was president, democrats said they wouldn't cut taxes at all. bush ended up winning that pr battle and the conversation wasn't about whether they would cut taxes and how much they would cut taxes and conversely here what we have is the president moving forward with his agenda which was to raise taxes and now a republicans who had their heels firmly dug in are now saying instead of not raising taxes let's just talk about how much we're going to raise taxes, so it appears for the most
and some in washington, d.c.. how unions trying to persuade democratso avoid spending cuts? >> with a significant lobbying effort on capitol hill and a new advertising campaign targeted at democratic and republican lawmakers in pesylvania, virginia and missouri. the basic message is don't touch entitlements in the fiscal cliff tops we're having on capitol hill. honesty and one of the union says elected officials from both parties need to listen to the will of the voters and focus on rebuilding the middle class and strengthening our economy by investing in jobs, not cuts. as for the effectiveness of this campaign one conservative says this type of pressure from unions is nothing new. >> the fact that they are publicly saying what they have been privately saying helps the american people understand where obama's in trend and comes from but nothing has changed. >> the issue is in the fiscal cliff discussion democrats appear willing to put entitlements and spending on the table. republicans sang they're willing to do tax revenue and that could be or would be the key to any agre
economists say would hurt this economy if we were to do it. rich: there is some discussion in washington about increasing it for a higher rate than what the president wants. the president wants it for $250,000 a year. a threshold will not make that much of a difference. raising the threshold to a half-million would mean 7 billion was to the treasury over the next decade. bump it up to a million dollars, it is even less. congress returns from thanksgiving recess this week dagen: thank you. rich edson down in washington. more than 40% of the nearly 5 million americans that receive unemployment insurance and benefits are set to lose those in federal programs expire as scheduled at the end of the year. we have the editorial page editor for the washington examiner joining us now from the nation's capital. is now a good time to let them expire? >> there really is no good solution now. this has been handled so poorly since the beginning of the obama stimulus package. when benefits were extended, and this was 99 weeks, that is such a long time to lengthen benefits. you put people in a position w
herridge is live in washington. she has more on all of this. so this shift in focus to the state department, what are we learning about that, catherine? report thank you, jon, and good morning. we may learn early as this week when secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the warnings and intelligence leading up to the 9/11 attack on the consulate. on sunday talk shows leading republicans pointed to what they believe is the culpability of clinton's state department. >> why weren't the warnings about the need for security heeded? why weren't the requests for help during the terrorist attack answered? and why did the administration think it had to cover up all of the things that occurred before by putting out to the american people a narrative that i think will turn out to be absolutely false? >> reporter: republicans have left the door open for ambassador rice to explain her controversial comments on those sunday talk shows leading democrats are coming to her defense saying she relied on the best available information provided by the u.s. intelligence community. >
national television. >> some people, you know, they stand for something. i went to washington to try to change -- >> i agree with that. then they should stand for it on their own. they shouldn't have to sign a pledge from somebody else. >> what they're talking about again is tax revenue and the house speaker has talked about it. mitt romney campaigned on it. >> lowering deductions and closing loopholes. >> eliminate or limit rather deductions and credits and exemptions. cutting out the exemptions and loopholes. >> grow this economy and engage in tax reform. >> simplify the code. >> ywhen you get divorced, thats what happens. ♪ >> welcome back after the thanksgiving holiday and all eyes are on the fast approaching fiscal cliff with republicans possibly maybe looking to make a deal. with the deadline now just 36 days away, some top republicans suggest they could, shock, horror, break with their sacred pledge to grover norquist. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge i made tennesseans aware is just elected that the only thing i'm honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when
washington. instead of bills both parties are passing political spin. a gop political phrase like common ground and balanced approach. then there's the always popular promise to stop any job killing small business tax hikes. got to love that one. meantime democrats continue to announce tax hikes. tomorrow senator dick durbin will bill what's major address to lay out the progressive case for a bipartisan deal and later this week the second white house meeting with meetings from both sides of the aisle. joining us is our post tag team bill russert and bloomberg's stephanie ruhle. she rules. unwrap that for us, brother. >> well, they would say the good news is that there has been some movement from senate republicans on the issue of raising taxes. lindsey graham, saxby chambless talking about a tax revenue. medicare, medicaid, perhaps we could have some meaningful entitlement reform. that's the good news, that there seems to be this idea that we can work out a big partisan deal. we both know taxes going up. entitlement, benefits going down. however, when we get into the bad news is t
with our folks in washington. we'll bring you more updates on that. martha: it is hard to believe it has been a month since superstorm sandy hit the east coast but one of the haddest hit areas was our beloved jersey shore. point pleasant beach you're looking at there the devastation was shocking in that area. our rick leventhal roid out the storm there. he joins us from point pleasant beach to see how the recovery is going. does it look like there is action four weeks later, rick? >> reporter: it is remarkable how much work that is left to be done here. the township has heavy equipment here picking up piles of debris from a oceanfront home that is boarded up. the whole front porch was ripped off by the storm surge. the dunes were washed away. the town rebuilt them sort of. they piled up some sand. there is still a lot of work to be done the dunes. we'll show you how much sand and debris is left on the sides of the road and sidewalk. piles of concrete. down the street, this is washington avenue, this was underwater. many homes have piles of debris in front of them as we've been seeing up
. cnn political editor paul steinhauser is live from washington, d.c. this morning. nice to see you, paul. so the fiscal cliff triggers back-breaking tax hikes and massive spending cuts. you've got more numbers that show what type of budget plan americans actually prefer. >> exactly. one of the big arguments, zoraida, is should it be all spending cuts to get us there or tax increases, as well? brand-new numbers just out from cnn/orc. only about one in three say whatever deal should be struck should be just spending cuts. but almost seven in ten, two thirds of americans say the plan should include spending cuts and tax increases. our poll indicates americans are not so optimistic a deal will get done and if it doesn't get done, who gets the blame? look at this right here, about 45% say republicans in congress will be blamed if there is no deal and the country falls off the fiscal cliff. about a third say the president should get the blame. and about 15% say you know what? both sides get the blame. >> let's focus on those republicans. a lot are saying they will violate grover norquist
ginnis is in washington with what republicans and democrats now say they are willing to do to reach a deal. >> reporter: president obama and congress begin negotiations this week to avoid are the coming fiscal cliff, about $6 billion in tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in. both sides say they're looking for ways to compromise. >> that's what it's about, if regan and o'neill can do it, obama should be able to do it. >> reporter: but republicans have consistently voted against any deal that raises tax revenue. >> the key is whether or not the republicans will move away from the id logically rigid tradition which was the grove pledge that they will not go for additional revenue. >> reporter: for the first time the antitax pledge seems to be negotiable. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid the coming grief and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> reporter: but new revenue doesn't necessarily mean new taxes. >> i would be very much opposed to raising tax rates, but i believe we can close a lot of loopholes. >> reporter: and d
of next month, tax increases and spending cuts will kick in. we have more from washington with signs of a compromise. >> reporter: back from the turkey dinners, lawmakers are fresh. for months, efforts to avoid the tax increases and $100 billion in spending cuts have failed. republicans have been unwilling to raise taxes and democrats have been refusing to cut social security and medicare. now all that is changed. >> i'm willing to generate revenue. it is fair to ask my party to put revenue on the table. >> reporter: senator lindsey graham will violate a policy not to raise taxes. >> from my side of the table, bring reform. >> reporter: the promises come with contingencies. many republicans want to raise revenue by capping tax deductions or closing loopholes. democrats are still trying to keep some entitlement programs out of negotiations. >> social security set aside. it doesn't add to the deficit. when it comes to medicare and medicaid, protect the program. >> reporter: distance from a deal still evident although the gap between lawmakers is closing. just this morning, the white ho
sunday." >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend we're watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt to gaza to the continuing converse over the benghazi attack. to talk about it all is senator john mccain. welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> thank you. dancing with turkeys? >> chris: you'll have to wait until the end of the show to see. >> that's what we're doing now. >> chris: let's start with egypt where president morsi granted himself unchecked powers and sent thousands of protesters back into the streets, people who had been helping to topple mubarak, now against the man they call the new egypt egyptian pharaoh. what are the chances we're headed for a new islamist coo in egypt? >> it could be headed that way. you could also be headed back to a military takeover. if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there's continued chaos. i'll never forget after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square. a young woman said it's not the first election we worry abou
and michelle cottle, washington correspondent for newsweek and the daily beast. thank you both for coming on the show. >> thanks, rev. >> michelle, let me go to you first. let's leave the other tax reform issues for aside for the moment. how can they defend not raising rates? >> this is fundamental to the house republicans got elected and who they are. taxation is stealing under any circumstances you don't raise the tax rates. and this whole grover norquist pledge, i agree, is a complete distraction. no matter how you feel about taxes, you don't want to look like you're tied to and being given marching orders by somebody who people have never heard of. i don't think the norquist pledge really matters. the house, in particular, has a problem with any kind of tax rate hike. >> now, jared, you're the economist. what is the economic part of this? give me how the economy is impacted by the rates as opposed to what they are saying. >> well, it's a very important question because the argument underlying the republican position is that if you increase the tax rate on the top 2% of households, you
of the year. the realization of an ultimatum created to be so distasteful, washington power brokers would do anything to avoid it. i'm referring to the so-called fiscal cliff. you may have heard about it. it's the simultaneous convergence of tax increases and spending cuts designed to pressure lawmakers accepting other negotiated deficit reduction changes. it includes expiration of the bush era tax cuts that would effect everyone. expiration of the tax cut around for years can be called a tax increase. the nonpartisan budget office would bring in $1 trillion in ten years. on tap, 1.2 trillion in spending cuts for ten years. $100 billion in first year. half to defense programs. half to nondefense. cbo says going off the cliff would lead to a recession next year. we have fox team coverage tonight. ed henry is trying to read tea leaves on a day of mixed signals from all sides but we begin with mike emanuel on the possibility that g.o.p. lawmakers may put their oath of office above a promise to antitax increase organizer. good evening. >> good evening. the republican sources say they are offerin
in washington. on this holiday weekend, we are watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt, to gaza. to the continuing controversy over the benghazi attacks. here to talk about it all is senator john mccain, and, senator, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> thank you, chris, dancing with turkeys? >> chris: you have to wait until the end of the show to see. >> i thought we were doing that now! >> chris: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. th
, to see what happens in washington. >> we've had a lot -- you know what's going to happen on the volatility side, we talk about that as a bad thing. figure you're a short term, 35, 45-day trader, that is a bad thing. if you're not, looking for entry points, these are the moments you're looking for to actually establish positions in names. >> you'd buy on these dips we've had? >> yes. but i'd make sure it's more than just a dip. i would buy on a bigger pullback. >> are you saying wait until we get clarity or buy on the dips? >> no, i agree with what michael said. first of all, i think there are assets that will do well over long term, whether we go over the fiscal cliff or not. dividend paying stocks outside of the united states. mega caps. there are some assets you want to own. one example, muns bonds. o one place you may want to consider -- >> we had a guest on last hour, we asked specifically about that idea and he said, i get it but they've run up so much, the risk/rewartd d is out of balanc and too risky. >> too expensive, he said. >> well, i think the entire fixed inc
irwin is an economics editor and columnist for the "washington post." what's the overview of the number so far? what do you take from them? >> well, there are a couple of trends, obviously. one is the consumer is in a very good mood for good reason. income growth is decent. job growth is coming along, as it were. housing is doing well. so consumers are in a pretty good mood, consumer confidence is at a four-year high and that's reflected in the christmas sales, if you will. they're solid. they're reasonable strong, 4%, 5% growth year over year. as you said earlier, it's really the online sales that are booming, well into the double digits. you mentionedly the 20% rate, and that's what we're expecting this year compared to last europe solid growth in terms of total spending by consumers on christmas goods and holiday sales. but the really interesting story is the online story where it's just growing like gangbusters. >> brown: let me ask cone. we talked about early shopping season. how are retailers dealing with the change? it's a lan landscape that changed even from a few years ago. >>
and whether the egyptian people have. we'll ask ambassador bolton what he thinks. >>> in washington we're hearing new concerns over the fate of the recently ramped up budget talks in washington and what they're talking about is your money and how much they're going to take. after a growing number of liberal democrats now say they would rather see a series of automatic tax hikes punish all americans rather than to agree to spending cuts or deals they don't like and they believe compromise their principles. this comes despite warnings from the congressional budget office that the tax hikes now about to take place could throw the economy back into recession. two million more americans could be left out of a job and most troubling of all according to the pentagon, the country's national security would be in serious jeopardy. if congress and the white house do not act. chris stirewalt is our fox news digital politics editor p.o.w. or play on foxnews.com. they cut the deal that put the automatic spending cuts in place and these automatic tax hikes in place thinking this will never happen. th
-- always in view with rain likely. >>> happening now -- you are looking at live pictures from washington, d.c. of the official capitol christmas tree. it arrived just moments ago. you can see it there lying horizontally. it's a 65-foot tree. it's being delivered from white river national forest in colorado. the tree will be covered with 5,000 ornaments and it will be lit by house speaker, john boehner, doing the honors to power that tree on december 4th. so look forward to that. but pretty shot there. >> how would you like to deck kate that -- decorate that. >> yeah. >>> why a gas company president is defending a worker who caused the massive explosion in massachusetts. [chanting] >>> and what's happening in egypt after several days of violent clashes after the new leader's power grab. you know how much grandma wanted to be here for your fist christmas? you see grandma lives waaaay down here, and you live way up here. brian, your cousin, he's a little bit older than you, he lives here, in chicago. and your aunt lisa lives here, in baltimore. uncle earnie? waaay out in hawaii. but don't you
breaking and brewing, in washington, get out of town. >> lou: and what do you think of the president deciding to use the language of the former military government, of burma, and refer to burma as myanmar, what do you make of that, if anything? >> well, i really don't know what to make of it. but, certainly, while he's out there, on this trip, i certainly hope he would take the opportunity to condemn china for its bullying and aggressive tactics and items island imperialism in the south and east china sea and while he's there, he should make it very clear to china that should their tactics involve any hostilities between our allies, japan, and the philippines, our mutual defense treaty will be brought into play. anything less than that, will not deter china from its aggressive tactics. a shot needs to be fired across our bow. >> lou: turning to israel and the engagement with hamas, which looks like, right now, despite the involvement of the united nations secretary-general and others, in trying to mediate, it looksike it could well turn into a ground operation, which the israelis hav
, secretary of the net debt is one of the most respected and experienced hands in washington. his resume is legendary. chairman of the budget committee back in the day when they actually passed a budget, director of the office of management and budget, and chief of staff to president clinton when the white house, director of the central intelligence agency, and now secretary of defense, so the question is what in the world are you going to do next. this extraordinary resume does not do justice to the man. leon panetta is a wonderful human being and in some ways a man of contrasts. i am going to give you examples. he is known among his counterparts around the world for his warm italian bear hugs. he is also known for the laser light focus he displayed on hunting down osama bin laden. he often holds meetings in his pentagon office with his dog curled up around his feet as he is pressing a commander on how a war plan is going to advance or how they are going to make more progress. when traveling, who he is known to hang out in the back of the plan with staff and journalists and waxing eloqu
with the news from washington. >> harris, republicans and democrats alike think that closing loopholes to raise revenue is a good idea. republicans are resisting the idea that inleasing tax rates on the wealthy will steer the country away from the fiscal cliff even though suspects insist it will. >> i would be very much opposed to raising tax rates, but i believe that we can close a lot of lop holes. >> they have to go up, real or effective tax rates, there are ways of doing this and secondly, we have to gross loopholes. >> lindsey graham is okay with new revenue and willing to cap deductions to get it, but only if democrats agree to reform entitlements like social security and medicare. >> i don't expect the democrats to go for premium ouci do expect them to adjust these entitlement programs before they bankrupt the company. some entilement reform is okay with illinois democratic senator dig durbin, but thinks that social security should be left alone. >> social security does not add one penny to our debt. not a penny. it's a separate funded operation and we can do things and i believe we shou
into andrews base. there the carter family spent 15 minutes saying their last goodbyes to washington officials. then they boarded the plane to georgia where the president was finally going to make that announcement. >> just a few moments ago on air force one, i had received word officially for the first time that the ano carrierá on the first leg of a journey home. and that everyone of the hostages was alive, well and free. >> this is bill thomas reports. >> the first day of freedom for the 52 hostages was darkened today by emerging tales of beatings at the hands of their captors. >> the stories coming back from the air force hospital in germany are sketchy. feltering in from the families of the former prisoners who have tried in emotional terms to recall all that was said in a phone call from a loved one- half a world away. malcolm shall told his brother that he was beaten for trying to escape. the parents of marine start sergeant jimmy lopez says he was forced to sleep in a closet and abused. but the mental torture apparently was much worse and far more common than the physical abuse. the m
up the challenge the 1996 defensive marriage act. >>> in washington the looming fiscal cliff is topping the news. >> for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> without a bipartisan plan, bush era tax cuts will expire. congressional leaders expect another face to face meeting with president obama as soon as this week. >> republican senator john mccain backed off from fiery criticism of susan rice about the 9/11 attack against the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi libya. >> i think she deserves the ability to explain herself and her position just as she said. but she's not the problem. the problem is the president of the united states who on -- in a debate with mitt romney said that he had said it was a terrorist attack, he hadn 't. >> rice has maintained she based her statements on protesters on cia intelligence available at the time. four americans including u.s. ambassador to libya chris stevens were killed. >>> police are making progress in recovering some 2 million donations made to the salvation early. police in toronto said earlier in the
this weekend while surrounded by destruction. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." with david gregory. >>> president obama doing his part for the economy over the weekend out holiday shopping as part of small business saturday, picking up several children's book at an independent bookstore iypÑarlington. >>> meanwhile, uncertainty in the middle east. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for t
imagination does such a response exist. foos what he thinks should be done in washington, he says he supports president obama's proposal to eliminate the bush tax cuts for high income taxpayers. however, he says he prefers a cut off points somewhere above $250,000, maybe 500 thud or so. additionally, he says we need congress right new to enact a minimum tax on high incomes. buffett is suggests 20% between $1 million and $10 million and 30% on amounts above that and that's something he had laid out before. the real definition of the buffett rule. >> i always thought he was uncomfortable about the way the buffett rule was constructed and felt uncomfortable about saying something about it. because remember, he never really spoke openly about it, he would intimate that 250 might not be his number. >> the buffett rule is 30%. >> but then he's also talking about the 500. >> but that's not the buffett rule. but if you're doing tax reform, then you're not going up anyway. >> i think the main point he's saying is forget about the larger reforms p. maybe we'll get withere, maybe won't, but put that in
a deal. joining me from the washington insider debate is republican strategist. and we have a good morning to both of you. we know republicans don't want to raise tuckets. but democrats might have to. do i have it right? >> you have to right. and question is republicans are going to have to put revenue on the table. what they don't want to do is raising rates because it tends to harm economic growth particularly in the small business sector. they file the business income on the returns. this will continue. and we need to find a way to raise revenue without rates. we'll get a stop gap measure. and democrats are not honest about entitlement reform. maybe we will get rid of the deduction. and are democrats going to do the same thing about spending cuts. they need to learn the lessons of the election. merrence are unifiped. thea want to preserve income. and want to see washington work together. and republicans dug in their heels and they paid the consequences. it is also the republicans that are forced to compromise. it is in terms of fiscal cliff. and so they have three legs necessary
-paying jobs for people struggling in this economy. >> well, now washington and the world can breathe a sigh of relief. the horrible crisis that would occur if we defaulted, the likelihood of recession has been averted, but we have a lot more work to do. a lot more work to do. the bill, which had things that were mentioned, had a lot of things we did not like. it had some things we like, but it really making sure no benefits in medicare, -- social security, and medicaid were cut. but, it is now time for congress to get back to the regularly- scheduled programming, and that means jobs. washington has been consumed with averting default, the nation's unemployment problem has been worsening. it is time for jobs to be moved back to the front burner. with the debt reduction package completed, we now have a single- minded focus on jobs for september by removing the threat of default for the next 18 months and by proving both parties can come together to get our deficit under control we have provided certainty to the credit markets. the debt limit agreement largely resolve the budgets for the next
you think washington officials, people doing these negotiations, will act like responsible adults, or spoiled children? well, i think it's pretty clear what the answer is there. two-thirds said spoiled children. and if there is no deal, the blame game. who will get blamed more? look at this number, 45% say republicans in congress will get blamed. only 34% said president obama will get blamed, and 15%, everybody is going to get the blame if there is no deal. john? >> spoiled children. paul steinhauser, great talking to you. >>> we'll look at the new apparent willingness of some republican senators to raise taxes. it's interesting. do you ever wish we had ipads... to practice math more? i love math! but two ipads means two data plans? that's crazy. maybe not. with at&t mobile share, adding an ipad is just $10 a month. but honestly, mom and dad's love is all i really need. we should keep these for us. we should keep these. what?! [ male announcer ] at&t mobile share. add an ipad for just $10 a month. one plan. up to 10 devices. at&t. rethink possible. one plan. up to 10 devices. shop
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